My Family Was Poor to My Grave

It is the matter of saving my life in the powerful and powerless independence. 

My mother was able to teach me in reading.

She was an émigré from Dominica.

She showed my importance for my brothers.

Without electrical service and without plumbing, my family was poor to my grave.

 

It is the matter of saving my life in the powerful and powerless independence. 

My mother knew my stepfather would build cabinets.

She did not allow my biological father into my life.

She expected money from my work as au pair for an affluent family in Scarsdale New York, USA.

Without electrical service and without plumbing, my family was poor to my grave.

 

It is the matter of saving my life in the powerful and powerless independence. 

My mother gave no aspirations of help towards my career as a writer.

She did not know my name, Elaine Potter Richardson, changed to Jamaica Kincaid in 1973. 

She rejected my intellectual gift from my childhood.

Without electrical service and without plumbing, my family was poor to my grave.

 

It is the matter of saving my life in the powerful and powerless independence. 

My mother did not speak to William Shawn, editor of the New Yorker.

She did not marry in 1979 to Allen Shawn, a classical composer and the son of Ted Shawn. 

She did not publish my notes to my observations of the West Indian Day parade.

Without electrical service and without plumbing, my family was poor to my grave.

 

It is the matter of saving my life in the powerful and powerless independence. 

My mother from Antigua severed my bond as her daughter in that colonial culture with long-endured oppression.

She did not write my slim novel Annie John in 1985. 

She in an evocative image devastated the coming-of-age for this Caribbean Girl.

Without electrical service and without plumbing, my family was poor to my grave.

—Tammy Ligon, Scottsburg 

 

A Mother’s Love 

A mother’s love, a beautiful thing

Tis’ like the flowers in the spring

It joys the heart each day along

And makes the world burst into song

 

A mother’s love, oh taste and see

Tis’ like an ice-cold glass of tea

It brings sweet peace in hottest hours

And melts the strike like summer showers. 

 

A mother’s love, so very fair

Tis’ like the fresh, crisp autumn air

When breathed in deeply it delights 

And wraps the home in splendor bright.

 

A mother’s love, when it is tried

Tis’ like the chill of wintertide

And yet the heart though cold to some 

Is to perfect that little one. 

—Joshua Good, Halifax

 

April

A - April, come precious April, I’ve missed you so.

P - Promise me you’ll stay a while, you’ll be my comforter, this I know.

R - Remember, you always appear when I need you most.

I – Imagine you forgetting me so soon. I’ve waited for you, morning, night, and noon.

L – Listen sweet April of my heart. Come right on, we’ve been waiting long for sweet spring to start.

—Julia Carrington, South Boston

 

Coronavirus Hope 

Hope you and yours are doing better.

No trial ever lasts forever.

There is light at the end of the tunnel,

When God makes our pain His endless blessing funnel.

—Shirley Satterfield, South Boston

 

What Would Jesus Do?

How important are other people to us?

Sometimes we see them as just “in our way.”

Sometimes we see them as stepping stones,

Or maybe we don’t think of them all day.

 

Jesus was comfortable being a carpenter’s son.

For Himself, no attention He wanted to pursue.

He saw others as worthy of His attention, and

Isn’t that what He wants us to daily to strive do?

 

Paul said to give each other more honor

Than we want for ourselves to give.

Let’s try to make others feel important.

That’s how God desires that we live.

—Barbara Stevens, South Boston

 

Sunny Little Thoughts

Little cheery thoughts during your day will keep you positive.

If we brighten someone else, amazing! How much you yourself feel encouraged. 

You can call a friend, neighbor or family member to say hello, or you could go to the market for them.

Sunny little thoughts will motivate you to cheer someone, as God is all about making others feel happy. 

—Pat Roberts, South Boston