Jerry Remines of South Boston was sentenced to 20 years of incarceration on Friday in the Halifax County Circuit Court for one count of possession of child pornography, 10 counts of possession of child pornography, second or subsequent offense, and one count of computer trespass.

In delivering the sentence, Judge Kimberley S. White noted that if Remines, and people like Remines, did not seek out child pornography, children would not be victimized by its creation, noting that every image Remines viewed was a re-victimization of the child depicted.

Judge White also noted the extreme nature of the pornography Remines sought, including sexual abuse of infants and the sexual torture of children.

“We are thankful for the high quality investigation by the Special Agents of the Virginia State Police and the entirety of the South Boston Police Department. The successful prosecution of Jerry Remines would not have been possible without their efforts,” said Commonwealth’s Attorney Tracy Q. Martin.

The case was prosecuted by Anna Bowen who serves as an Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney and juvenile court specialist.

At the Jan. 12 trial, evidence was produced that the defendant had not only possessed child pornography, but also was a member of, and moderated, various chat groups with an explicit interest in underage and taboo pornography.

At sentencing, the commonwealth argued that there were two sides to Remines: the side he showed the public — a veteran, family man and business owner — and the hidden side that victimized his customers and actively sought out child pornography for his own sexual gratification, according to Martin.

The commonwealth highlighted that even after trial, when special agents from the Virginia State Police showed the court step-by-step exactly how Remines sought out and interacted with child porn, Remines refused to take an accountability of his actions. Moreover, by being a consumer of child pornography, Remines participated in creating a demand for materials that by definition exploited and abused children, Martin added.

The commonwealth asked the court to sentence Remines severely, inviting the court to give Remines every day of the maximum105 years plus twelve months, said Martin.

The defense argued that Remines should receive a minimal sentence because these were his first criminal convictions and he had been a distinguished soldier, asking that the defendant be sentenced to only four years.

Remines, when given the opportunity to speak before pronouncing sentence, stated he didn’t know how all this happened, and blamed a number of health ailments for child pornography being present on his phone.