Bard

This recently restored barn sits on a well-made stone foundation approximately 3 feet high and has a series of bents connected via mortises and tenon joints, and secured with wooden pegs. The tier poles are hand hewn and the exterior siding was applied using cut nails.

The Barts’ barn, owned by Gayle and Larry Barts, is a mid-19th century timber-framed tobacco pack barn used to store tobacco after it was cured on River Road. The barn is an unusual barn unlike other tobacco pack barns in the area.

It sits on a well-made stone foundation approximately 3 feet high and has a series of bents connected via mortises and tenon joints, and secured with wooden pegs. The tier poles are hand hewn and the exterior siding was applied using cut nails.

The barn also has carpenter’s marks of Roman numerals chiseled into the timbers to help identify matching joints.

The farm, which was named Double Oak Farm, belonged to Peter Tyce Dodson and Mary Dodson in the mid-19th century. Their son, Henry Clay Dodson (1869-1946), and his wife Fannie Adams Dodson lived there after their house on Jeremy Creek Road was destroyed by fire. The property has at least two dwellings and several other early outbuildings. A Dodson Family Cemetery is also on the property.

Because of its early and unique construction, the Barts’ barn was included in Preservation Virginia/JTI’s Tobacco Barn program in 2019.

Clint Johnson and Eddie Powell of Johnson Brothers Construction in South Boston completed the barn rehabilitation work including repairing the roof and stone foundation, rebuilding the windows and replacing about 75 % of the deteriorated siding.

All of the work was done to maintain as much of the historic fabric of the barn as possible.

3-D mapping of the barn is currently being completed and a historical marker will be installed to educate the public about this exceptional barn and how it was used in tobacco farming.