I am sure that everyone has seen articles floating around Facebook and other sources about the Stanford swimmer rape charges and sentencing. This is a topic that I normally wouldn’t talk about because I try to keep things on the sane track of politics.

The complete and utter failure of the court to appropriately punish this young man has astounded me. Do I think that this particular instance has anything to do with preference for the male defendant?

No, I think this has everything to do with affluence and a pitiful justice system.

For those of you who are unaware, in 2015, Brock Turner attended a fraternity party and apparently drank until his blood alcohol content was well over double the legal limit.

While at this party, he met a young woman who also had overindulged in alcohol. No one knows really what happened in between the time that they met and when he was found sexually assaulting her while she was unconscious and tried to run away, but one thing is for sure, this is something that happens often off and on college campuses.

Both women and men face an immense amount of danger when it comes to sexual assault at colleges and universities.

Back in March, Turner was convicted of three felony sexual assault counts. He was just sentenced a few days ago to only six months in county jail.

Yes, he will have to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life, but six months in jail is truly baffling.

Turner’s life is already over, his reputation will be destroyed for the rest of his life, and rightfully so.

However, his victim’s life also has negatively changed forever. After stating in court the ways that she has been emotionally and physically damaged, she had to watch her attacker be ordered to only six months in jail.

Why?

Because of his affluence. He was a Stanford student. He was a three-time All-American swimmer. He’s supposed to have a future, so jail was the best option that the judge could procure.

The justice system failed here and failed hard.

Turner’s father claims that 20 minutes of his son’s life doesn’t constitute 20 years in prison. I think that if his son attempted to flee after he was discovered assaulting the girl, then he knew what he was doing was wrong and should be punished accordingly.

This whole ordeal reminds me of the “Affluenza Teen,” who killed four people in a drunk driving accident in 2013 and only received probation and therapy to treat his affluenza.

It’s absolutely disgusting how justice seems to prefer those with money or a bright future ahead of them.

Amanda Long is a freelancer writer for The Gazette-Virginian.